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Whats On

Media Watch: Sunday 6th January – Friday 11th January 2019

SUNDAY

 

BBC World Service

12.06pm: From the Ground Up

The Central African Republic is one of the least developed countries on earth. Years of conflict have left hundreds of thousands of people displaced. Sexual violence is rife and extreme poverty is endemic. Yet despite this dire humanitarian situation, reporting from CAR is rare.

Anna Foster explores the challenges facing this nation from the inside, and hears from those trying to improve its fortunes. She also assesses whether the deep religious divisions will prove a lasting barrier to real peace. In the capital Bangui, the PK5 Muslim enclave is a scene of regular violence. Anna visits a maternity unit that transforms into a casualty centre at times of crisis, and hears what it is like to live in one of the most tense places in the country.

She discovers how people are struggling to live in the divided city of Kaga Bandoro. Beyond the capital there is almost no infrastructure, and the lack of electricity, running water, police officers and teachers makes improving the country for the next generation a tough task.

Russia and China are keeping a keen eye on CAR. They see potential in the chaos, not least because of the untapped mineral riches it holds. But how do the people of this struggling country view that interest?

From the rape survivors and former child soldiers to the very heart of government, Anna hears forgotten voices and sheds a new light on this most brutal of conflicts.

BBC Radio 4

1.30pm: Class Act

Lenny Henry looks at how to level the playing field for young aspiring actors from low income and BAME backgrounds.

 

BBC World Service

2.50pm: Elana Meyer: Running For The New South Africa 

At the 1992 Olympics in Barcelona, the South African middle-distance runner Elana Meyer was her country’s best hope for its first gold medal since returning to international sport following the end of Apartheid. In a dramatic race, Meyer ended up finishing second but, in a moment that became a symbol of African unity, the white South African immediately embarked on a victory lap hand-in-hand with the Ethiopian winner, Derartu Tulu. Elana Meyer talks to Claire Bowes.

BBC Radio 4

5pm: Brexit Bewitched Bothered or Bewildered 

As we enter the New Year Adrian Chiles returns to voters he first met for the BBC more than two years ago and who come from both sides of the Brexit divide. Being alongside them he focuses on the issues they now feel lie at the heart of this complex debate as it enters its end game

 

BBC Radio 4

5.40pm: Profile: Stormzy

Grime music’s biggest star, Stormzy, says he’s from a place “where success doesn’t happen”. But he’s had a remarkable rise to fame. Six years ago Stormzy, real name Michael Omari, was working at an oil refinery in Southampton. Now, he’s a millionaire. His success began with his debut album Gang Signs & Prayer, the first grime record to reach number one. It’s not just his music that has made him a household name in the UK. During the 2017 General Election, he lent his support to Jeremy Corbyn and at the Brit Awards last year he used his fame to speak out against the Government’s response to Grenfell. This summer Stormzy will be the first grime act to headline at Glastonbury, his performance to beamed to million across the world.

 

MONDAY

 

 

BBC Radio 4

10.45am: Maya Angelou’s Autobiographies Ep.1  All Gods Children Need Travelling Shoes

After her son’s road accident, Maya’s helped by the kindness of Ghana’s famous poet and playwright Efua Sutherland. She’s also helped by ex-pat’s living close by, whom she names as the ‘revolutionary returnees’. As a group of Black Americans they are all hoping to assimilate into Ghanaian life, but it’s not quite as they expected.

Narrator – Maya – Adjoa Andoh
Maya – Pippa Bennett Warner
Guy – Tristan Slowly
Julian Mayfield – Cyril Nri
Efua Sutherland – Gbemisola Ikumelo
Dramatised by Patricia Cumper
Produced and directed by Pauline Harris

BBC Radio 4

8.30pm: Crossing Continents: The Brazilian Footballer Who Never Was

At 12, Douglas Braga arrived in Rio de Janeiro, a wide-eyed boy, ready to live out the Brazilian dream and become a professional footballer. At 18, he was signed by one of the country’s top teams – but was also starting to realise he couldn’t be true to himself and be a footballer. By 21, he’d quit the game. He knew he was gay and felt there was no place for him in a macho culture where homophobia is commonplace and out gay men are nowhere to be seen.

Now, at 36, Douglas lives in a country that just elected a self-styled “proud homophobe” as president, which some football fans have taken as a licence to step up their homophobic abuse and threats. But Douglas is back on the pitch and – with a growing number of other gay footballers – fighting back.

 

 

TUESDAY

 

BBC Radio 4

10.45am: Maya Angelou’s Autobiographies Ep.1  All Gods Children Need Travelling Shoes Ep.1

After a run in with European professors at the university where Maya works, she’s humbled by an older local servant who offers wise advice. Maya also befriends a local hairdresser, who believes she’s been cursed.

Narrator – Maya – Adjoa Andoh
Maya – Pippa Bennett Warner
Guy – Tristan Slowly
Julian Mayfield – Cyril Nri
Efua Sutherland – Gbemisola Ikumelo
Dramatised by Patricia Cumper
Produced and directed by Pauline Harris

 

BBC 1

11.25pm:  “Fake Homeless”: Who’s Begging on the Streets?

Ellie Flynn investigates reports of people being duped by beggars claiming to be homeless. She visits Cambridgeshire, where police have adopted a zero-tolerance approach to begging, and speaks to so-called `homeless vigilante’ Ashley Sims in Devon. He photographs, investigates and shames people he believes are pretending to be homeless

WEDNESDAY

BBC Radio 4

10.45am: Maya Angelou’s Autobiographies Ep.1  All Gods Children Need Travelling Shoes Ep.3

Maya continues her quest to assimilate into Ghanaian life. She hires a boy whose true identity takes her by surprise, and when she dates a rich Mali trader, Sheikhali, there’s a clash of cultures.

Narrator – Maya – Adjoa Andoh
Maya – Pippa Bennett Warner
Guy – Tristan Slowly
Julian Mayfield – Cyril Nri
Efua Sutherland – Gbemisola Ikumelo
Dramatised by Patricia Cumper
Produced and directed by Pauline Harris

 

Aljazeera

10.30pm: People & Power: Niger- Europe Migration

People & Power investigates a controversial programme that has helped turn one of the world’s poorest nations into Europe’s southern border.

 

THURSDAY

BBC Radio 4

10.45am: Maya Angelou’s Autobiographies Ep.1  All Gods Children Need Travelling Shoes Ep.4

Maya and supporters march in Ghana to echo Martin Luther King’s 1963 monumental march in Washington DC. Their yearning for full citizenship in the US is laid bare once more. She and her group of ex-pats are inspired by a visit from Malcolm X.

Narrator – Maya – Adjoa Andoh
Maya – Pippa Bennett Warner
Guy – Tristan Slowly
Julian Mayfield – Cyril Nri
Efua Sutherland – Gbemisola Ikumelo
Dramatised by Patricia Cumper
Produced and directed by Pauline Harris

BBC 1

8pm: Britain’s Fat Fight with Hugh Fearnley- Whittingstall

Britain is already the fattest country in Western Europe and if trends continue, more than 50 per cent will be obese by 2050. Last year, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall presented a three-part documentary in which he set out to tackle the national obesity crisis. Now he returns with a final instalment, examining some of the misleading marketing claims on `healthier’ products, unveiling the truth about why Brits love to snack and challenging a family to rethink their portion sizes. He also heads to Westminster with Jamie Oliver to talk to MPs about the obesity crisis and gets an opportunity to put his questions directly to the Health Minister

FRIDAY

BBC Radio 4

10.45am: Maya Angelou’s Autobiographies Ep.1  All Gods Children Need Travelling Shoes Ep.5

On Maya’s return from Berlin Malcolm X writes asking for her to work for him back in the US . She goes on one last journey in Ghana and makes a startling discovery about her family’s descent.

Narrator – Maya – Adjoa Andoh
Maya – Pippa Bennett Warner
Guy – Tristan Slowly
Julian Mayfield – Cyril Nri
Efua Sutherland – Gbemisola Ikumelo
Dramatised by Patricia Cumper
Produced and directed by Pauline Harris

 

 

 

Categories
International News News Radio

BBC launches services for Ethiopia and Eritrea

The BBC World Service has launched three websites for Ethiopia and neighbouring Eritrea as part of its biggest expansion since the 1940s.

The sites would be a “source of truth” in a region with limited independent media, said BBC editor Will Ross.

The Amharic, Afaan Oromo and Tigrinya sites’ launch will be followed in a few months by the launch of radio programmes in the three languages.

The UK government announced a funding boost for the World Service in 2015.

It paved the way for the expansion drive in Africa and Asia.

“We know that there is a great deal of hunger for audiences in Ethiopia and Eritrea to access a broad range of high quality content in Amharic, Afaan Oromo and Tigrinya,” said Ross, head of the new services.

Eritrea won independence from Ethiopia in 1993 after a 30-year war.

Tensions with Ethiopia remain high across a closed and heavily fortified border.

An estimated 80,000 people died during a 1998-2000 border war between the two states.

“There is also a significant diaspora, which retains strong links with ‘home’. The political situation in both countries has triggered the development of a large vocal, activist presence in the diaspora,” he said.

“The current news choice for many in Ethiopia is either a pro-government platform at home or a vehemently anti-government offer from the diaspora.”

Grey line

The Ge’ez alphabet

  • Amharic and Tigrinya use the Ge’ez alphabet
  • Afaan Oromo used to be written in Ge’ez but now uses Latin
  • The Ge’ez alphabet is more than 5,000 years old
  • The Ge’ez language is now only used in religious services but its script is used in 13 other languages spoken in Ethiopia and Eritrea
  • It is written from left to right, like Latin
  • It has 26 consonants, which are written slightly differently according to which of seven vowel sounds follow them

The new Facebook pages in the three languages have already generated a lot of interest. The Afaan Oromo site had more than 30,000 likes after just three days.

However, internet penetration is currently very low in both states, and the planned launch of radio programmes would be a vital part of the BBC’s “rich mix of content” for Ethiopians and Eritreans, Ross said.

“A major aim of the output will be to help Ethiopians and Eritreans better understand their place in the world. The new language services will also provide the BBC’s global audience with a far better perspective and understanding of the Horn of Africa,” he added.

African languages:

  • Afaan Oromo: Language of Ethiopia’s biggest ethnic group
  • Amharic: Ethiopia’s official language
  • Tigrinya: The main working language of Eritrea, along with Arabic. Also spoken in Ethiopia
  • Igbo: Spoken in south-eastern Nigeria, and also in Equatorial Guinea
  • Yoruba: Spoken in south-western Nigeria and some other parts of West Africa, especially Benin and Togo
  • Pidgin: A creole version of English widely spoken in southern Nigeria, Ghana, Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea

Asian languages:

  • Gujarati: Native to the Indian state of Gujarat but found around the Indian subcontinent and the world
  • Marathi: From the Indian state of Maharashtra, including India’s commercial capital Mumbai
  • Telugu: Huge numbers of speakers, like many Indian languages, primarily in Andhra Pradesh and Telangana
  • Punjabi: One of the world’s most populous languages, it is widely-spoken in Pakistan and parts of India
  • Korean: Spoken in North and South though the dialects have diverged. Pop culture slang and foreign loan words are notably more common in the South

 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-41270170

 

 

Categories
Whats On

Media Watch: 15th December – 20th December

MONDAY

BBC World Service

1.32pm: The Case Against Meat

The first of two programmes about meat eating. The Food Chain examines the arguments against eating animal protein. Manuela Saragosa weighs up the biological, economic and environmental costs of eating a meat-rich diet.

Why is it that the richer a country gets, the more meat people consume? Shoppers in China explain why serving meat is their way of showing love.

We hear how the answer to how much meat is healthy for us to eat might lie in our gut. And, leading American food writer Michael Pollan examines the omnivore’s dilemma – how does meat eating fit in with the urge to live a healthy and ethical life?

 

BBC World Service

8.32pm: The Conversation –  Advertising Execs: Nunu Ntshingila and Vasudha Narayanan

As the Chair of one of South Africa’s largest agencies, Ogilvy & Mather, Nunu Ntshingila is among the highest ranking women in world advertising. Born in Soweto in the 1960s, she learned her trade under Apartheid when both the working environment and the marketplace were racially divided. Later she had the job of marketing the ‘new South Africa’ as a tourist destination and has since overseen campaigns for some of the world’s biggest brands. Nunu says she moved “from the struggle between black and white to the gender struggle” and talks about her limited ability to change the way black women are portrayed in advertising.

Vasudha Narayanan is the executive creative director at the Lowe Lintas agency in India. Based in Mumbai she says advertising is not an easy job – especially for women – as the unconventional working hours and frequent parties can raise eyebrows in conservative society. Vasudha says she is conscious about the influence her adverts have on society. She says: “It’s men who need to change their attitudes – we try and encourage men to behave better”

 

THURSDAY

 

BBC Radio 4

8pm: The Report- Rape: Prosecuting Accusers

The suicide of a woman being prosecuted for falsely crying rape has raised questions about the best way of dealing with these cases.

In this week’s edition we hear the story of Paul Fensome, who was investigated and jailed after a false rape claim. His accuser was convicted of perverting the course of justice. Some say her prison sentence was too harsh and she should have been dealt with far more sympathetically. Do cases like this deter women from reporting rape, or is it the best way to get justice for men who go through the ordeal of clearing their name?

 

BBC 1

9pm: Apple’s Broken Promises

Apple is arguably the most valuable brand on the planet, making products that a vast number of consumers want – but how are the workers putting its highly desirable gadgetry together really treated? Panorama goes undercover in China to show what life is like for the workers making the iPhone 6, and reporter Richard Bilton travels to Indonesia to find children working in some of the most dangerous mines in the world, finding out what happens to the tin they dig out by hand

 

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Whats On

Media Watch: Monday 29th September – Friday 3rd October

MONDAY

BBC World Service

8.05am: Hard Talk: Opera Singer – Jessye Norman

Hardtalk speaks to Jessye Norman, who is acknowledged as one of the greatest singers of her generation. Her voice has enthralled audiences in the world’s greatest concert halls and opera houses for decades. She was born in America’s segregated south with a talent that transcended barriers. Has her success helped to tear those barriers down?

 

BBC Radio 4

8pm: Inside the Ebola Lockdown

Tim Mansel gives a day by day account of the attempt to ensure that the 5.8-million people of Sierra Leone stay in their homes for three days. They will be visited “hos to hos” (house-to-house) by hastily assembled teams drawn from 21,000 volunteers and given health advice on how to prevent the spread of Ebola.

BBC 4

9pm: Lost Kingdoms of Central America – Between Oceans and Empires

Dr Jago Cooper chronicles the history of the people of ancient Costa Rica, who built a series of spectacular settlements among the rivers and volcanos of Central America. Admiring the civilisation’s hundreds of giant stone spheres, the presenter tries to unravel the civilisation’s enigmatic legacy, which archaeologists are still exploring
BBC 4

12.25am: Prince- Purple Reign

A profile of the enigmatic American musician, who rose to fame in the 1980s with hits including 1999, Kiss and Raspberry Beret.

As well as achieving significant commercial success around the world, he won critical acclaim for his adventurous, genre-blurring albums, such as Sign O’ the Times and Around the World in a Day – while also making headlines for his sexually explicit lyrics and stage shows, as well as his legal battle to retain control of his name and music.

Featuring contributions by guitarist Dez Dickerson, Public Enemy frontman Chuck D, soul singer Beverley Knight and Paisley Park

 

WEDNESDAY

BBC 2

9pm: This World- Rwanda’s Untold Story

Twenty years on from the Rwandan genocide, Jane Corbin examines evidence that challenges the accepted story of one of the most horrifying events of the late 20th century. The country’s president Paul Kagame has long been portrayed as the man who brought an end to the killing and rescued his country from oblivion, but there are increasing questions about the role of his Rwandan Patriotic Front forces in the dark days of 1994 and in the years since.

The film investigates the shooting down of the presidential plane that sparked the killings in 1994, questions Kagame’s claims to have ended the genocide and examines allegations of war crimes committed by his forces and their allies in the wars in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Part of the This World strand
BBC 1

11.05pm: Cocaine Capital of the World: Stacey Dooley Investigates

New series. The presenter heads to remote and hostile regions to meet people involved in the global drugs trade – including producers and traffickers who are on the run from the authorities.

In the first edition, Stacey discovers why Peru is known as the world’s cocaine capital. Beginning her journey in Lima, she visits a British man who was jailed for smuggling the substance into Europe, before linking up with government forces as they launch a major crackdown on the farmers that earn their living through its production. She then treks through the rainforest to find out how a new strain of coca plant is being grown.

 

THURSDAY

Channel 5

9pm: No Foreigners Here – 100% British

New series. Documentary following the lives of the residents of the Manchester suburb of Cheetham Hill, which was identified by the 2011 census as being one of Britain’s most ethnically diverse areas, exploring the multicultural community through weddings, festivals, local shops and schools.

The first episode features Israeli Jew Amos, who runs a kosher deli ably assisted by his right-hand man Imran, a Muslim from Afghanistan, while traveller Joseph’s new Bulgarian helper hasn’t been in the country long, and the most simple instructions are often lost in translation

 

FRIDAY

BBC Radio 4

11.27pm: Reimagining the City- Birmingham

Musician Soweto Kinch offers a different vision of a city he’s loved all his life – Birmingham.

Categories
Uncategorized

BBC launches Hausa TV news programme

A television news programme broadcast in the West African Hausa language has been launched by the BBC.
The 10-minute weekday bulletins are the first time an international broadcaster has aired news programmes in the west African language.

Hausa is spoken by an estimated 50 million people in Nigeria, Niger and parts of northern Ghana.

The bulletins will be available on the BBC Hausa website and rebroadcast on some TV channels.

Liliane Landor, World Service controller of languages, said: “We are proud to be the first among international broadcasters to launch TV content in Hausa.”

“The new TV bulletins will further broaden BBC Hausa’s appeal to audiences – on TV and online – and reinforce the BBC’s presence on the African media arena.”

 

Article Source

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Whats On

Media Watch: Monday 1st September – Friday 5th Sepember

MONDAY

ITV1

8pm: The Food We Eat- Tonight

By 2050, the world’s population could be more than nine billion, meaning an extra 2.3 billion mouths to feed. With this estimate in mind, Jonathan Maitland looks to the future of food, asking what people will be eating in years to come. He meets experts who want to redesign cities and a scientist who is making beef burgers in a laboratory. He also invites guests to a dinner party where insects are on the menu. Last in the series
BBC 1

8.30pm: Panorama – Stolen Childhoods: The Grooming Scandal

Following recent reports that more than 1,400 children have been victims of grooming and sexual exploitation in Rotherham, South Yorkshire, Alison Holt investigates why the police and council apparently ignored warnings of the abuse. She speaks with people who repeatedly tried to raise the alarm and hears from young people and their families, demanding to know why they weren’t protected.

WEDNESDAY

BBC World Service

2.32pm: The Documentary

Mark Coles meets the crate diggers devoted to giving Africa’s obscure musical gems a new lease of life.

BBC 2

9pm: Horizon- Inside the Dark Web

Twenty-five years after the World Wide Web was created, the issue of surveillance has become the greatest controversy of its existence. With many concerned that governments and corporations can monitor people’s every move, this programme meets hackers and scientists who are using technology to fight back, as well as the law enforcement officers who believe it’s leading to opportunities for risk-free crimes. With contributors including World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee and WikiLeaks co-founder Julian Assange
Aljazeera

10.30pm: People & Power: The Battle for Africa (Pt2)

The conclusion of a two part People & Power investigation into the effects of China’s increasing influence in Africa.

THURSDAY

BBC Radio 4

11.30am: Tupac Shakur- Hip-hop Immortal

Poet Al Letson recalls the life of Tupac Shakur, a conflicted African American folk hero. The son of a black panther, Tupac Shakur, trained as an actor, posed as a street thug and became a best selling rapper. He continues to be mythologised, revered and highlighted like no other. He was shot and killed 18 years ago, yet he is still the third biggest selling hip hop artist.

ITV1

7.30pm The Shape of Things to Come?: Tonight

New research has revealed that young women in the UK are the most overweight in western Europe, with one in 12 being clinically obese. Despite the nation’s love of dieting and fitness, the obesity crisis looks set to get worse. Aasmah Mir investigates, exploring what factors are at play
Channel 4

9pm: Educating the East End

New series. Documentary following life at Frederick Bremer School in Walthamstow, east London. The comprehensive’s newest teacher, Mr Bispham, learns the job isn’t always plain sailing, especially when it comes to educating Year 9 girls, while pupil Tawny focuses on winning a place at the prestigious Brit School for Performing Arts & Technology, but she’s competing against her best friend Alice. With Acacia’s mother sick in hospital, staff are on hand to help the 14-year-old through a difficult time
BBC 4

10.40pm: Nelson’s Caribbean Hell-Hole: An Eighteenth Century Navy Graveyard Uncovered

After the discovery of human bones on a beach in Antigua, historian Sam Willis investigates one of the darkest chapters of Britain’s imperial past. As archaeologists excavate a mass grave of British soldiers, he explores the island’s ruins and discovers how the sugar islands of the Caribbean were rife with sun, sea, war, tropical diseases and poisoned rum

 

FRIDAY

ITV1

9pm: Piers Morgans Life Stories- Alesha Dixon

New series. The singer and Britain’s Got Talent judge chats about her career and personal life, opening up to Piers about how, after finding fame with Mis-Teeq and as a solo artist, she lost her record contract and found out her husband was having an affair, all in the space of a few weeks. She speaks about being on the receiving end of a backlash after replacing Arlene Phillips on Strictly Come Dancing, and reveals how she juggles motherhood with song writing and her TV work

Categories
Whats On

Media Watch: Sunday 17th August – Saturday 23rd August

SUNDAY

BBC World Service

7.32am: Love from Hate

Lourens Groenewald is a white South African and a former policeman, who was involved in the notorious suppression of the Soweto Uprising. Dorah Mazibuko is a black South African whose son was active in the fight against apartheid. Mpho Lakaje tells the story of their unlikely friendship.

Aljazeera

8pm: Tutu’s Children (Ep3)

Young African leaders are challenged to put their ideas into practice on the ground, and breaking African taboos tests their friendships.

BBC 4

11pm: Egypt’s Lost Cities

Dallas Campbell and Liz Bonnin join Dr Sarah Parcak on a journey to Egypt to find out whether cities, temples and pyramids are lying beneath the sands. The potential existence of the buildings was suggested by satellites as part of an alternative approach to archaeology

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MONDAY

BBC World Service

6.32pm: Discovery: Antibiotics Resistance Crisis

The discovery and harnessing of antibiotic drugs in the mid twentieth century led some medics to predict the end of infectious diseases. But the bacteria fought and continue to fight back, evolving resistance to many of the drugs that used to kill them. Public health officials warn that without new drugs, medicine will return to the days where ‘a cut finger on Monday leads to death of Friday’. Without protective antibiotics to keep infections at bay, scores of standard surgical operations and chemotherapy for cancer will become too risky.

Roland Pease looks at scientific issues behind the gathering crisis. The last new class of antibiotics was discovered in the 1980s. Are there any others in the pipeline?

 

ITV1

8pm: Tonight: The Food we Eat

New series. A second run of programmes exploring Britain’s relationship with food. One in five families eat convenience food at least three times a week and it is claimed only one in six cook a fresh meal from scratch every day. Jonathan Maitland investigates what can be done to get the nation back in the kitchen.

 

BBC 2

9pm: Horizon: Should I Eat Meat- The Big Health Dilemma (Pt1)

In the first of two programmes this week investigating the truth about meat, Michael Mosley asks if those summer barbecue favourites – burgers and sausages – are as bad as some people think. He puts the latest scientific findings to the test on a high-meat diet to discover whether eating beef and bacon every day will do him any harm.

 

Channel 4

11.05pm: Dispatches: Nigeria’s Hidden War

The kidnap of almost 300 schoolgirls by Nigeria’s hardline Islamist fighters Boko Haram in Chibok in April caused international outrage. It sparked a global campaign demanding their return and pledges of increased military support to Nigeria from the UK, the US and other nations.

However, as the girls languish in guerrilla camps with no sign of rescue, Dispatches reporter Evan Williams investigates another side to Nigeria’s war on Islamist terror – claims of a violent campaign by its security forces against ordinary civilians.

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TUESDAY

BBC Radio 4

4.30pm: Great Lives – Baroness Oona King on Ida B. Wells

Matthew Parris leads a discussion on Ida B. Wells the African American civil rights and women’s rights activist who was a political trailblazer.

Throughout her life, Wells was militant in her demands for equality and justice for black Americans and she encouraged the African American community to fight for positive change through their own efforts.

She was an investigative journalist who highlighted the practice of lynching in the United States, showing how it was used as a way to control or punish blacks , often under the guise of trumped up rape charges. Ida was also active in women’s rights and the women’s suffrage movement, establishing several notable women’s organizations.

She was a skilled and inspiring rhetorician, and traveled internationally on lecture tours. She is the great life chosen this week by Baroness Oona King.

 

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WEDNESDAY

BBC Radio 4

2.32pm: The Documentary – Roots Reggae and Rebellion

Rastafari is Jamaica’s most famous export. British musican and poet Akala examines the culture of his Rastafarian heritage.

 

Aljazeera

8pm: Witness: Bnking the Unbanked

Is microfinance the answer to poverty? Two young Gambian bankers work to make their microfinance institution Reliance into a successful business.

 

BBC 2

9pm: Horizon: Should I Eat Meat – How to Feed the Planet

Part two of two. Every year roughly 65 billion animals are slaughtered globally for food – nine for every living person. In this documentary, Michael Mosley examines the impact this is having on the planet and finds out what meat we should be buying if we want to be eco-friendly carnivores. Is it better to purchase free-range organic or factory-farmed options? The answers are far from obvious.

 

Channel 4

12.10am: Something from Nothing – The Art of Rap

Documentary in which rapper and actor Ice-T visits both old-school icons and reigning superstars to discuss the art behind rap music. With contributions from Dr Dre, Eminem, Run DMC and Snoop Lion.

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SATURDAY

BBC Radio 4

11am: Democracy and the Arts in South Africa

Twenty years on from the end of apartheid, what role can the arts play now in helping South African society develop? Recorded with an audience at the National Arts Festival in Grahamstown, Bridget Kendall talks to playwright Mike Van Graan, poet Phillippa Yaa de Villiers, arts journalist Percy Mabandu, and jazz singer Nomfundo Xaluva who performs live for us.